Negotiation Books: Table of Contents

  1. Basic Negotiation
  2. Women and Negotiating
  3. Advanced Negotiation: Negotiating and Emotions

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Basic Negotiation

 

Bargaining for Advantage: Negotiation Strategies for Reasonable People

2nd Edition, May 2, 2006

Richard Shell

Bargaining for Advantage

As director of the renowned Wharton Executive Negotiation Workshop, Professor G. Richard Shell has taught thousands of business leaders, administrators, and other professionals how to survive and thrive in the sometimes rough-and-tumble world of negotiation. His systematic, step-by-step approach comes to life in this book, which is available in over ten foreign editions and combines lively storytelling, proven tactics, and reliable insights gleaned from the latest negotiation research.

This updated edition includes:

  • A band-new “Negotiation I.Q.” test designed by Shell and used by executives at the Wharton workshop that reveals each reader’s unique strengths and weaknesses as a negotiator.
  • A concise manual on how to avoid the perils and pitfalls of online negotiations involving e-mail and instant messaging.
  • A detailed look at how gender and cultural differences can derail negotiations, and advice for putting talks back on track.

 

Beyond Winning: Negotiating to Create Value in Deals and Disputes

March 8, 2004
Robert H. Mnookin, Scott R. Peppet, Andrew S. Tulumello

 

Beyond Winning

Conflict is inevitable, in both deals and disputes. Yet when clients call in the lawyers to haggle over who gets how much of the pie, traditional hard-bargaining tactics can lead to ruin. Too often, deals blow up, cases don’t settle, relationships fall apart, justice is delayed. Beyond Winning charts a way out of our current crisis of confidence in the legal system. It offers a fresh look at negotiation, aimed at helping lawyers turn disputes into deals, and deals into better deals, through practical, tough-minded problem-solving techniques.

In this step-by-step guide to conflict resolution, the authors describe the many obstacles that can derail a legal negotiation, both behind the bargaining table with one’s own client and across the table with the other side. They offer clear, candid advice about ways lawyers can search for beneficial trades, enlarge the scope of interests, improve communication, minimize transaction costs, and leave both sides better off than before. But lawyers cannot do the job alone. People who hire lawyers must help change the game from conflict to collaboration. The entrepreneur structuring a joint venture, the plaintiff embroiled in a civil suit, the CEO negotiating an employment contract, the real estate developer concerned with environmental hazards, the parent considering a custody battle―clients who understand the pressures and incentives a lawyer faces can work more effectively within the legal system to promote their own best interests. Attorneys exhausted by the trench warfare of cases that drag on for years will find here a positive, proven approach to revitalizing their profession.

 

Getting to Yes: Negotiating Agreement Without Giving In

May 3, 2011
Roger Fisher, William L. Ury, Bruce Patton

Getting to Yes

Since its original publication nearly thirty years ago, “Getting to Yes” has helped millions of people learn a better way to negotiate. One of the primary business texts of the modern era, it is based on the work of the Harvard Negotiation Project, a group that deals with all levels of negotiation and conflict resolution.

“Getting to Yes” offers a proven, step-by-step strategy for coming to mutually acceptable agreements in every sort of conflict. Thoroughly updated and revised, it offers readers a straight- forward, universally applicable method for negotiating personal and professional disputes without getting angry-or getting taken.

 

Getting Ready to Negotiate: The “Getting to Yes” Workbook

August 1, 1995
Roger Fisher, Danny Ertel

Getting Ready to Negotiate

Based on the philosophy and advice presented in Getting to Yes – be prepared, negotiate interests not positions, understand the other side’s interests, and work together – this is the tool that will help each person design the negotiating strategy that is best for him or her in any given situation. Getting Ready to Negotiate presents case studies, charts, and forms for blueprinting a personalized negotiating strategy, one that is certain to make negotiating situations more productive and profitable.

 

Negotiation Boot Camp: How to Resolve Conflict, Satisfy Customers, and Make Better Deals

December 26, 2006
Ed Brodow

Negotiation Bootcamp

YOU NEVER STOP NEGOTIATING. Give yourself an edge with this brand new second edition of the bestselling book by negotiation expert Ed Brodow, creator of the acclaimed Negotiation Boot Camp® Seminars. Brodow arms us with the same proven strategies and tactics he teaches to the professional negotiators at Microsoft, Goldman Sachs, The Hartford, Learjet, Novartis, McKinsey, the IRS and the Pentagon. Using a wealth of examples from real-life encounters, Brodow reveals how to develop the skills and the confidence you need to achieve your goals at work and in your personal life. After completing Brodow’s basic training program, you will have learned how to:

  • Conquer your fear of confrontation and overcome the negative behaviors that hold you back.
  • Identify and develop your personal negotiation style.
  • Assess the other side’s strengths and weaknesses.
  • Get the other side to make concessions without giving up any of your goals.
  • Master the art of listening to understand the other side’s position and strengthen your own.
  • Avoid getting sidetracked by personal or emotional issues.
  • Create an atmosphere of trust in which the other party is a collaborator rather than a competitor.
  • Break through impasses and close the deal.

 

3D Negotiation: Powerful Tools to Change the Game in Your Most Important Deals

October 1, 2006
David A. Lax, James K. Sebenius

3D Negotiation

When discussing being stuck in a “win-win vs. win-lose” debate, most negotiation books focus on face-to-face tactics. Yet, table tactics are only the “first dimension” of David A. Lax and James K. Sebenius’ pathbreaking 3-D Negotiation (TM) approach, developed from their decades of doing deals and analyzing great dealmakers. Moves in their “second dimension”—deal design—systematically unlock economic and noneconomic value by creatively structuring agreements. But what sets the 3-D approach apart is its “third dimension”: setup. Before showing up at a bargaining session, 3-D Negotiators ensure that the right parties have been approached, in the right sequence, to address the right interests, under the right expectations, and facing the right consequences of walking away if there is no deal. This new arsenal of moves away from the table often has the greatest impact on the negotiated outcome. Packed with practical steps and cases, 3-D Negotiation demonstrates how superior setup moves plus insightful deal designs can enable you to reach remarkable agreements at the table, unattainable by standard tactics.

 

Negotiation: Strategies for Mutual Gain

June 24, 1993
Edited by Lavinia Hall

Negotiation: Strategies for Mutual Gain

With contributions from top scholars in the field of negotiation, this clear and entertaining volume effectively blends technique with theory to present frameworks for effective negotiating, analyses of person-to-person negotiating situations and applications in organizational settings. Building on the concept that conflict, when managed well, can provide the impetus for growth, constructive change and mutual benefit, the book is dedicated to breaking the paradigm of winning and losing and transforming negotiation into a search for improved solutions to problems.

 

The Only Negotiating Guide You’ll Ever Need: 101 Ways to Win Every Time in Any Situation

September 9, 2003
Peter Stark, Jane Flaherty

The Only Negotiating Guide You'll Ever Need

The Essential Guide to the Power of Persuasion.

In The Only Negotiating Guide You’ll Ever Need, Peter Stark and Jane Flaherty, celebrated consultants to some of the country’s top companies, take the dread out of persuasion. Their 101 Winning Tactics make powerful negotiating skills easy and accessible, giving you tools and knowledge you can put to use right away. Each tactic is on a single page, with a clever and memorable name, a true-to-life example of how to use it, and suggested counter tactics in case someone tries it on you. All 101 tactics are so accessible and empowering that you will find yourself using them immediately–and maybe not just at work.

 

Start with NO..The Negotiating Tools that the Pros Don’t Want You to Know

July 9, 2002
Jim Camp

Start With No

Think win-win is the best way to make the deal? Think again. It’s the worst possible way to get the best deal. This is the dirty little secret of corporate America.

For years now, win-win has been the paradigm for business negotiation—the “fair” way for all concerned. But don’t believe it. Today, win-win is just the seductive mantra used by the toughest negotiators to get the other side to compromise unnecessarily, early, and often. Have you ever heard someone on the other side of the table say, “Let’s team up on this, partner”? It all sounds so good, but these negotiators take their naive “partners” to the cleaners, deal after deal. Start with No shows you how they accomplish this. It shows you how such negotiations end up as win-lose. It exposes the scam for what it really is. And it guarantees that you’ll never be a victim again.

Win-win plays to your emotions. It takes advantage of your instinct and desire to make the deal. Start with No teaches you how to understand and control these emotions. It teaches you how to ignore the siren call of the final result, which you can’t really control, and how to focus instead on the activities and behavior that you can and must control in order to negotiate with the pros.

Start with No introduces a system of decision-based negotiation. Never again will you be out there on a wing and a prayer. Never again will you feel out of control. Never again will you compromise unnecessarily. Never again will you lose a negotiation.

The best negotiators:

  • aren’t interested in “yes”—they prefer “no”
  • never, ever rush to close, but always let the other side feel comfortable and secure
  • are never needy; they take advantage of the other party’s neediness
  • create a “blank slate” to ensure they ask questions and listen to the answers, to make sure they have no assumptions and expectations
  • always have a mission and purpose that guides their decisions
  • don’t send so much as an e-mail without an agenda for what they want to accomplish
  • know the four “budgets” for themselves and for the other side: time, energy, money, and emotion
  • never waste time with people who don’t really make the decision

Start with No offers a contrarian, counterintuitive system for negotiating any kind of deal in any kind of situation—the purchase of a new house, a multimillion-dollar business deal, or where to take the kids for dinner. It is full of dozens of business as well as personal stories illustrating each point of the system. It will change your life as a negotiator. If you put to good use the principles and practices revealed here, you will become an immeasurably better negotiator.

 

Never Split the Difference: Negotiating As If Your Life Depended On It

May 17, 2016
Chris Voss, Tahl Raz

Never Split the Difference

A former international hostage negotiator for the FBI offers a new, field-tested approach to high-stakes negotiations—whether in the boardroom or at home.

After a stint policing the rough streets of Kansas City, Missouri, Chris Voss joined the FBI, where his career as a hostage negotiator brought him face-to-face with a range of criminals, including bank robbers and terrorists. Reaching the pinnacle of his profession, he became the FBI’s lead international kidnapping negotiator. Never Split the Difference takes you inside the world of high-stakes negotiations and into Voss’s head, revealing the skills that helped him and his colleagues succeed where it mattered most: saving lives. In this practical guide, he shares the nine effective principles—counterintuitive tactics and strategies—you too can use to become more persuasive in both your professional and personal life.

Life is a series of negotiations you should be prepared for: buying a car, negotiating a salary, buying a home, renegotiating rent, deliberating with your partner. Taking emotional intelligence and intuition to the next level, Never Split the Difference gives you the competitive edge in any discussion.

Women and Negotiating

 

The Shadow Negotiation: How Women Can Master the Hidden Agendas That Determine Bargaining Success

October 3, 2000
Deborah Kolb, Judith Williams

The Shadow Negotiation

At last, here is a book that shows women how to recognize the Shadow Negotiation — in which the unspoken attitudes, hidden assumptions, and conflicting agendas that drive the bargaining process play out — and how to use that knowledge to their advantage.

Each time people bargain over issues — a promotion, a contract with a new client, a bigger role in decision-making — a parallel negotiation unfolds beneath the surface of the “formal” discussion. Bargainers constantly maneuver to determine whose interests and needs will hold sway, whose opinions will matter, and how cooperative each person will be in reaching an agreement.

How the issues are resolved hangs on the actions people take in the shadow negotiation, yet it is in this shadow negotiation that women most often run into trouble. The most productive negotiations take place when strong advocates can connect with each other. Good results depend equally on a bargainer’s positioning her ideas for a fair hearing and on being open to the other side’s point of view. But traditionally women have not fared well on either front. Often, they let negotiable moments slip by and take the first “no” as a final answer, or their efforts to be responsive to the other side’s position are interpreted as accommodation. As a result, women can come away from negotiations with fewer dollars, perks, plum assignments, or less say in decision-making than men.

To negotiate effectively, women must pay attention to acts of self-sabotage as well as to the moves others make in the shadow negotiation. By bargaining more strategically, women can establish the terms of their advocacy, their voice, and at the same time encourage the open communication essential to a collaborative discussion in which not only acceptable, but creative, agreements can be worked out.

Written by Deborah M. Kolb and Judith Williams, two authorities in the field, The Shadow Negotiation shows women a whole new way to think about the negotiation process. Kolb and Williams identify the common stumbling blocks that women encounter and present a game plan for turning their particular strengths to their advantage. Based on extensive interviews with hundreds of business-women, The Shadow Negotiation provides women with a clear, insightful guide to the hidden machinations that are at work in every bargaining situation.

 

Women Don’t Ask: Negotiation and the Gender Divide

September 22, 2003
Linda Babcock, Sara Laschever

Women Don't Ask

When Linda Babcock asked why so many male graduate students were teaching their own courses and most female students were assigned as assistants, her dean said: “More men ask. The women just don’t ask.” It turns out that whether they want higher salaries or more help at home, women often find it hard to ask. Sometimes they don’t know that change is possible–they don’t know that they can ask. Sometimes they fear that asking may damage a relationship. And sometimes they don’t ask because they’ve learned that society can react badly to women asserting their own needs and desires.

By looking at the barriers holding women back and the social forces constraining them, Women Don’t Ask shows women how to reframe their interactions and more accurately evaluate their opportunities. It teaches them how to ask for what they want in ways that feel comfortable and possible, taking into account the impact of asking on their relationships. And it teaches all of us how to recognize the ways in which our institutions, child-rearing practices, and unspoken assumptions perpetuate inequalities–inequalities that are not only fundamentally unfair but also inefficient and economically unsound.

With women’s progress toward full economic and social equality stalled, women’s lives becoming increasingly complex, and the structures of businesses changing, the ability to negotiate is no longer a luxury but a necessity. Drawing on research in psychology, sociology, economics, and organizational behavior as well as dozens of interviews with men and women from all walks of life, Women Don’t Ask is the first book to identify the dramatic difference between men and women in their propensity to negotiate for what they want. It tells women how to ask, and why they should.

 

Difficult Conversations: How to Discuss What Matters Most

November 2, 2010
Douglas Stone, Bruce Patton, Sheila Heen

Difficult Conversations

The 10th-anniversary edition of the New York Times business bestseller-now updated with “Answers to Ten Questions People Ask”

We attempt or avoid difficult conversations every day-whether dealing with an underperforming employee, disagreeing with a spouse, or negotiating with a client. From the Harvard Negotiation Project, the organization that brought you Getting to Yes, Difficult Conversations provides a step-by-step approach to having those tough conversations with less stress and more success. you’ll learn how to:

  • Decipher the underlying structure of every difficult conversation
  • Start a conversation without defensiveness
  • Listen for the meaning of what is not said
  • Stay balanced in the face of attacks and accusations
  • Move from emotion to productive problem solving

Advanced Negotiation: Negotiating and Emotions

 

Mapping the Mind: Revised and Updated

2nd (second) edition, 2010
Rita Carter

Mapping the Mind

Today a brain scan reveals our thoughts and moods as clearly as an X-ray reveals our bones. We can actually observe a person’s brain registering a joke or experiencing a painful memory. In Mapping the Mind, award-winning journalist Rita Carter draws on the latest imaging technology and science to chart how human behavior and personality reflect the biological mechanisms behind thought and emotion. This acclaimed book, a complete visual guide to the coconut-sized, wrinkled gray mass we carry around inside our heads, has now been completely revised and updated throughout. Among many other topics, Carter explores obsessions and addictions, the differences between men’s and women’s brains, and memory.

  • Comprehensively updated for this edition with the latest research, case studies, and contributions from distinguished scientists
  • Addresses recent controversies over behavior prediction and prevention
  • Includes new information on mirror neurons, unconscious cognition, and abnormalities in attention spans

 

Looking for Spinoza: Joy, Sorrow, and the Feeling Brain

December 1, 2003
Antonio Damasio

Looking for Spinoza

Joy, sorrow, jealousy, and awe—these and other feelings are the stuff of our daily lives. In the seventeenth century, the philosopher Spinoza devoted much of his life’s work examining how these emotions supported human survival, yet hundreds of years later the biological roots of what we feel remain a mystery. Leading neuroscientist Antonio Damasio—whose earlier books explore rational behavior and the notion of the self—rediscovers a man whose work ran counter to all the thinking of his day, pairing Spinoza’s insights with his own innovative scientific research to help us understand what we’re made of, and what we’re here for.

 

Descartes’ Error: Emotion, Reason, and the Human Brain

September 27, 2005
Antonio Damasio

Descartes' Error

Since Descartes famously proclaimed, “I think, therefore I am,” science has often overlooked emotions as the source of a person’s true being. Even modern neuroscience has tended, until recently, to concentrate on the cognitive aspects of brain function, disregarding emotions. This attitude began to change with the publication of Descartes’ Error in 1995. Antonio Damasio—”one of the world’s leading neurologists” (The New York Times)—challenged traditional ideas about the connection between emotions and rationality. In this wondrously engaging book, Damasio takes the reader on a journey of scientific discovery through a series of case studies, demonstrating what many of us have long suspected: emotions are not a luxury, they are essential to rational thinking and to normal social behavior.

 

Primal Leadership: Unleashing the Power of Emotional Intelligence

August 6, 2013
Daniel Goleman, Richard E. Boyatzis, Annie McKee

Primal Leadership

This is the book that established “emotional intelligence” in the business lexicon—and made it a necessary skill for leaders.

Managers and professionals across the globe have embraced Primal Leadership, affirming the importance of emotionally intelligent leadership. Its influence has also reached well beyond the business world: the book and its ideas are now used routinely in universities, business and medical schools, and professional training programs, and by a growing legion of professional coaches.

This refreshed edition, with a new preface by the authors, vividly illustrates the power—and the necessity—of leadership that is self-aware, empathic, motivating, and collaborative in a world that is ever more economically volatile and technologically complex. It is even timelier now than when it was originally published.

From bestselling authors Daniel Goleman, Richard Boyatzis, and Annie McKee, this groundbreaking book remains a must-read for anyone who leads or aspires to lead.

 

The Emotional Brain: The Mysterious Underpinnings of Emotional Life

March 27, 1998
Joseph LeDoux

The Emotional Brain

What happens in our brains to make us feel fear, love, hate, anger, joy? Do we control our emotions, or do they control us? Do animals have emotions? How can traumatic experiences in early childhood influence adult behavior, even though we have no conscious memory of them? In The Emotional Brain, Joseph LeDoux investigates the origins of human emotions and explains that many exist as part of complex neural systems that evolved to enable us to survive.

One of the principal researchers profiled in Daniel Goleman’s Emotional Intelligence, LeDoux is a leading authority in the field of neural science. In this provocative book, he explores the brain mechanisms underlying our emotions — mechanisms that are only now being revealed.

 

Negotiating Rationally

January 1, 1994
Max H. Bazerman, Margaret A. Neal

Negotiating Rationally

Most managers tend to behave irrationally in negotiations, according to the authors of this book. For example, managers tend to be overconfident, to recklessly escalate previous commitments, and fail to consider the tactics of the other party. Drawing on their research, the authors show how we are prisoners of our own assumptions. They identify strategies to avoid these pitfalls in negotiating by concentrating on opponents’ behaviour and developing the ability to recognize individual limitations and biases. They explain how to think rationally about the choice of reaching an agreement versus reaching an impasse.